#RE96Ab – 1940 14 2/5c grn, imperf, dl wmk, offset

Get the Only Known Block of Nine Imperforate Wine Stamps OR One of Three Known Imperforate Pairs

This is your chance to own a piece of philatelic history very few collectors know about… imperforate 1940 14-2/5¢ green Wine stamps (RE96Ab). 
 

Just Three Pairs and One Block of Nine Were Found!

This variety remained unknown for decades.  It wasn’t until the early 2000s that it was discovered in the vaults of the Smithsonian National Postal Museum.  This was the first time imperforate examples had ever been seen.  According to the Robert A. Siegel Auction House, the National Postal Museum lot is the ONLY source of the imperforate rarities. 
 
Since there are only 15 stamps in existence.  Getting the block of nine would make you the owner of 60% of all RE96Ab stamps!  It’s the largest multiple and is one-of-a-kind, making it the most valuable of the new variety.  The block of nine is in mint condition, has very fine centering, is never-hinged, and ungummed.  It’s beautiful and historic. 
 
It's not every day you have the opportunity to get something no one else can, but today, it’s your turn.  If you want to be THE ONE to own the notable block of nine rarity, OR a scarce imperforate pair (only one available) hurry and call 1-800-433-7811 right away!
 

More About Wine Stamps...

Wine revenue stamps showed the appropriate tax had been paid on the product. Strict regulations made it impossible for collectors to own them before 1954.  By law, the stamps could only be sold to proprietors of bonded wineries, store rooms and field warehouses. 
 
The use of Wine Revenue stamps on bottles, railroad tankers, and other containers was also heavily regulated. The stamps had to be affixed on the container securely in plain view, exposed to weather and other harsh elements. Winery proprietors were also required to destroy the stamp when the containers were emptied.
 
Collectors were barred from owning Wine Revenue stamps until 1949, and even then it was difficult or impossible to find mint copies. High face values also made it expensive for even wealthy collectors to purchase examples – in 1942, the $3,000 Wine revenue stamp cost the equivalent of $40,100 in today’s wages! 
 
Some denominations were printed by the Bureau of Engraving and Printing, but they were never distributed to the Internal Revenue Service.  Between the high cost, rules forbidding the public from owning the stamps, and general wear and tear on the stamps during use, it’s no wonder Wine Revenue stamps are scarce today.
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Get the Only Known Block of Nine Imperforate Wine Stamps OR One of Three Known Imperforate Pairs

This is your chance to own a piece of philatelic history very few collectors know about… imperforate 1940 14-2/5¢ green Wine stamps (RE96Ab). 
 

Just Three Pairs and One Block of Nine Were Found!

This variety remained unknown for decades.  It wasn’t until the early 2000s that it was discovered in the vaults of the Smithsonian National Postal Museum.  This was the first time imperforate examples had ever been seen.  According to the Robert A. Siegel Auction House, the National Postal Museum lot is the ONLY source of the imperforate rarities. 
 
Since there are only 15 stamps in existence.  Getting the block of nine would make you the owner of 60% of all RE96Ab stamps!  It’s the largest multiple and is one-of-a-kind, making it the most valuable of the new variety.  The block of nine is in mint condition, has very fine centering, is never-hinged, and ungummed.  It’s beautiful and historic. 
 
It's not every day you have the opportunity to get something no one else can, but today, it’s your turn.  If you want to be THE ONE to own the notable block of nine rarity, OR a scarce imperforate pair (only one available) hurry and call 1-800-433-7811 right away!
 

More About Wine Stamps...

Wine revenue stamps showed the appropriate tax had been paid on the product. Strict regulations made it impossible for collectors to own them before 1954.  By law, the stamps could only be sold to proprietors of bonded wineries, store rooms and field warehouses. 
 
The use of Wine Revenue stamps on bottles, railroad tankers, and other containers was also heavily regulated. The stamps had to be affixed on the container securely in plain view, exposed to weather and other harsh elements. Winery proprietors were also required to destroy the stamp when the containers were emptied.
 
Collectors were barred from owning Wine Revenue stamps until 1949, and even then it was difficult or impossible to find mint copies. High face values also made it expensive for even wealthy collectors to purchase examples – in 1942, the $3,000 Wine revenue stamp cost the equivalent of $40,100 in today’s wages! 
 
Some denominations were printed by the Bureau of Engraving and Printing, but they were never distributed to the Internal Revenue Service.  Between the high cost, rules forbidding the public from owning the stamps, and general wear and tear on the stamps during use, it’s no wonder Wine Revenue stamps are scarce today.