#Q10 – 1913 50c Parcel Post Stamp - Dairying

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U.S. #Q10
1913 50¢ Dairying
Parcel Post
 
Issue Date: March 15,1913
City: Washington, DC
Quantity: 2,117,793
Printed By: Bureau of Engraving and Printing
Printing Method: Engraved
Perforations:
12
Color: Carmine rose
 
In 1912, the U.S. Postal Department introduced parcel post service for sending items weighing 16 ounces or more through the mail.  The mail is divided into four classes, with parcel post making up the fourth class.  Almost any type of merchandise can be mailed parcel post, including day – old chicks, baby alligators, and honeybees.  Only items that could be dangerous to handle cannot be sent through Parcel Post. Rural Americans used the new mail class to access goods and merchandise they could not have gotten before, giving rise to mail order giants like Sears, Roebuck and Co. and Montgomery Ward and Co.
 
Twelve stamps with various denominations were issued in 1912-13 to prepay the fourth-class rate.  Although different vignette designs were featured, all twelve stamps used the same border and color, which caused a great deal of confusion for postal workers.
 
The 50¢ Parcel Post Stamp
The four Parcel Post stamps with the highest denomination feature manufacturing and agriculture. This stamp was originally supposed to picture the steel mill that was used for the 25¢ stamp. Instead it shows dairy cows contentedly grazing, with a farm in the background. This design was adapted from a Department of Agriculture photograph. Because of the change in design, the issue of these stamps was delayed until March 13,1913, and about 2 million of them were printed.  
 
Because of the confusion, the Postmaster General authorized ordinary postage for use on parcel post less than a year later.   Parcel post stamps were then made valid for all classes of mail and were used as regular postage until the supply was depleted. 
 

Department of Agriculture

1873 6¢ Yellow, Department of Agriculture, Lincoln, Hard Paper
US #O4 – 1873 Department of Agriculture stamp picturing Abraham Lincoln

On February 9, 1889, the US Department of Agriculture attained cabinet-level status.  The change was signed into law by President Grover Cleveland.

The United States Department of Agriculture, commonly called the USDA, has its roots in the patent office.  In 1837, lawyer Henry Leavitt Ellsworth became the commissioner of patents and sought a way to improve crops and livestock in America.  He began collecting and distributing seeds and plants to the rural communities through congressmen and agriculture societies.  For his foundational work, Ellsworth is called “The Father of the Department of Agriculture.”

2000 Flag Over Farm Rate Change, collection of 3 stamps
US #3448-50 – Flag Over Farm Rate Change Collection

The earliest incarnation of the Department of Agriculture was established in 1839 as the Agricultural Division of the Patent Office.  A decade later, the Patent Office was transferred to the new Department of Interior.  Over the next few years, calls were made to establish a separate bureau of agriculture.

1913 50¢ Dairying Parcel Post
US #Q10 was adapted from a Department of Agriculture photograph.

On May 15, 1862, President Abraham Lincoln approved the Department of Agriculture, led by a commissioner without Cabinet status.  Lincoln described the new department as the “people’s department.”  At the time, about half the country’s population lived on farms.  In the following decades, farmers and advocacy groups lobbied for the Department of Agriculture to get Cabinet rank.

1898 2¢ Trans-Mississippi Exposition: Farming in the West
US #286 – This 1898 Farming in the West stamp is based on a photo of a 27,000 acre “bonanza farm” in North Dakota.

The House of Representatives and Senate passed bills in 1887 giving the Department of Agriculture Cabinet status, but was dropped by a conference committee after farmers objected to the addition of labor.  Then, on February 9, 1889, President Grover Cleveland signed legislation elevating the department to Cabinet level.

1952 3¢ 4-H Club
US #1005 – Founded in 1902, the 4-H Club movement was supported by the USDA.

The Smith-Lever Act of 1914 established another important service of this department.  Cooperative extension offices are now in most rural counties of the US to provide education in agriculture and home economics.  Other programs directed by the USDA are 4-H and the Future Farmers of America (FFA), as well as support for colleges involved in agricultural research.

1953 3¢ Future Farmers of America
US #1024 – Future Farmers of America was established in 1928.

American farmers are often so successful at producing crops there is often a surplus.  The Department of Agriculture oversees food distribution programs in the US, such as free and reduced lunch and supplying food to low-income and homeless families each month.  Overseas programs provide relief to developing countries and those recovering from disasters.

2015 49¢ Summer Harvest
US #5004-07 – The USDA offers free seeds and resources for farmers.

Today, the Department of Agriculture oversees the development and implementation of federal government policy on farming, agriculture, and food.  It also works with farmers and ranchers to promote agricultural trade and production, ensure food safety, protect natural resources, assist rural communities, and put an end to hunger in America and around the world.

 
 
 
 
     
Read More - Click Here


U.S. #Q10
1913 50¢ Dairying
Parcel Post
 
Issue Date: March 15,1913
City: Washington, DC
Quantity: 2,117,793
Printed By: Bureau of Engraving and Printing
Printing Method: Engraved
Perforations:
12
Color: Carmine rose
 
In 1912, the U.S. Postal Department introduced parcel post service for sending items weighing 16 ounces or more through the mail.  The mail is divided into four classes, with parcel post making up the fourth class.  Almost any type of merchandise can be mailed parcel post, including day – old chicks, baby alligators, and honeybees.  Only items that could be dangerous to handle cannot be sent through Parcel Post. Rural Americans used the new mail class to access goods and merchandise they could not have gotten before, giving rise to mail order giants like Sears, Roebuck and Co. and Montgomery Ward and Co.
 
Twelve stamps with various denominations were issued in 1912-13 to prepay the fourth-class rate.  Although different vignette designs were featured, all twelve stamps used the same border and color, which caused a great deal of confusion for postal workers.
 
The 50¢ Parcel Post Stamp
The four Parcel Post stamps with the highest denomination feature manufacturing and agriculture. This stamp was originally supposed to picture the steel mill that was used for the 25¢ stamp. Instead it shows dairy cows contentedly grazing, with a farm in the background. This design was adapted from a Department of Agriculture photograph. Because of the change in design, the issue of these stamps was delayed until March 13,1913, and about 2 million of them were printed.  
 
Because of the confusion, the Postmaster General authorized ordinary postage for use on parcel post less than a year later.   Parcel post stamps were then made valid for all classes of mail and were used as regular postage until the supply was depleted. 
 

Department of Agriculture

1873 6¢ Yellow, Department of Agriculture, Lincoln, Hard Paper
US #O4 – 1873 Department of Agriculture stamp picturing Abraham Lincoln

On February 9, 1889, the US Department of Agriculture attained cabinet-level status.  The change was signed into law by President Grover Cleveland.

The United States Department of Agriculture, commonly called the USDA, has its roots in the patent office.  In 1837, lawyer Henry Leavitt Ellsworth became the commissioner of patents and sought a way to improve crops and livestock in America.  He began collecting and distributing seeds and plants to the rural communities through congressmen and agriculture societies.  For his foundational work, Ellsworth is called “The Father of the Department of Agriculture.”

2000 Flag Over Farm Rate Change, collection of 3 stamps
US #3448-50 – Flag Over Farm Rate Change Collection

The earliest incarnation of the Department of Agriculture was established in 1839 as the Agricultural Division of the Patent Office.  A decade later, the Patent Office was transferred to the new Department of Interior.  Over the next few years, calls were made to establish a separate bureau of agriculture.

1913 50¢ Dairying Parcel Post
US #Q10 was adapted from a Department of Agriculture photograph.

On May 15, 1862, President Abraham Lincoln approved the Department of Agriculture, led by a commissioner without Cabinet status.  Lincoln described the new department as the “people’s department.”  At the time, about half the country’s population lived on farms.  In the following decades, farmers and advocacy groups lobbied for the Department of Agriculture to get Cabinet rank.

1898 2¢ Trans-Mississippi Exposition: Farming in the West
US #286 – This 1898 Farming in the West stamp is based on a photo of a 27,000 acre “bonanza farm” in North Dakota.

The House of Representatives and Senate passed bills in 1887 giving the Department of Agriculture Cabinet status, but was dropped by a conference committee after farmers objected to the addition of labor.  Then, on February 9, 1889, President Grover Cleveland signed legislation elevating the department to Cabinet level.

1952 3¢ 4-H Club
US #1005 – Founded in 1902, the 4-H Club movement was supported by the USDA.

The Smith-Lever Act of 1914 established another important service of this department.  Cooperative extension offices are now in most rural counties of the US to provide education in agriculture and home economics.  Other programs directed by the USDA are 4-H and the Future Farmers of America (FFA), as well as support for colleges involved in agricultural research.

1953 3¢ Future Farmers of America
US #1024 – Future Farmers of America was established in 1928.

American farmers are often so successful at producing crops there is often a surplus.  The Department of Agriculture oversees food distribution programs in the US, such as free and reduced lunch and supplying food to low-income and homeless families each month.  Overseas programs provide relief to developing countries and those recovering from disasters.

2015 49¢ Summer Harvest
US #5004-07 – The USDA offers free seeds and resources for farmers.

Today, the Department of Agriculture oversees the development and implementation of federal government policy on farming, agriculture, and food.  It also works with farmers and ranchers to promote agricultural trade and production, ensure food safety, protect natural resources, assist rural communities, and put an end to hunger in America and around the world.