#O76 – 1873 7c brn, treasury, hard paper

Condition
Price
Qty
- Mint Stamp(s)
Ships in 1-2 business days.i$225.00
$225.00
- Used Single Stamp(s)
Ships in 1-2 business days.i$45.00
$45.00
- Unused Stamp(s) (small flaws)
Ships in 1-2 business days.i$140.00
$140.00
- Used Stamp(s) (small flaws)
Ships in 1-2 business days.i$26.50
$26.50
Mounts - Click Here
Condition
Price
Qty
- MM638215x33mm 25 Horizontal Strip Black Split-Back Mounts
Ships in 1-2 business days.i
$7.95
$7.95
- MM216829x33mm 50 Vertical Black Split-Back Mounts
Ships in 1-2 business days.i
$3.50
$3.50
 
U.S. #O76
1873 7¢ Stanton
Official Stamp – Treasury

Printed By: Continental Bank Note Co.
Printing Method: Engraved
Perforations:
12
Color: Brown
 
Official Mail stamps are genuine postage stamps, although they were never available at any post office.  These unique stamps are called Officials because their use was strictly limited to government mail.  Before 1873, government agencies had “franking” privileges.  This meant that government mail could be sent free of postage as long as it bore an authorized signature on the envelope.  As of July 1, 1873, “franking” privileges were discontinued and special official stamps were put into circulation for use on government mail.
 
Each department was issued its own set of stamps.  Many of the designs were taken from the current series of regular postage stamps being printed at that time - the so-called “Bank Note Issues.”  The department names were inscribed on the stamps instead of the usual “U.S. Postage” and each set was printed in its own distinct color.  Only the Post Office Department had its own unique design - a numeral in an oval frame.
 
In 1884, the Officials were declared obsolete and were replaced with the “penalty” envelope.  These envelopes were imprinted with an official emblem and carried a warning against unauthorized use by private individuals.
 

Birth Of Edwin Stanton

Edwin McMasters Stanton was born on December 19, 1814, Steubenville, Ohio.

As a child, Stanton attended private and seminary schools.  He suffered from severe asthma that prevented him from participating in strenuous physical activities.  So he took a great interest in books and poetry. 

After his father died, Stanton had to leave school to help earn money for the family.  He worked at a bookseller before briefly attending Kenyon College.  He was unable to finish his studies there because of his family’s financial woes.  So he returned to working in a book store.  Stanton then decided to study law.

After being admitted to the bar, Stanton opened a successful practice in Cadiz, Ohio, where he also worked with an anti-slavery society and wrote for and edited the local newspaper.  In 1837, he was made prosecutor of Harrison County.  Stanton soon grew more involved in politics and his law practice spread to Virginia and Pennsylvania.

In 1859, Stanton argued one of his most famous cases, serving as the defense attorney for Daniel E. Sickles.  Sickles was on trial for the murder of his wife’s lover, Philip Barton Key II (the son of Francis Scott Key).  Sickles was eventually acquitted after Stanton became one of the first US attorneys to use an insanity defense.

The following year, Stanton left his law practice when he was appointed attorney general under James Buchanan.  Stanton reportedly convinced Buchanan to drop his policy of secession tolerance and denounce it as illegal.

After Lincoln’s election to the presidency, he asked Stanton to become an advisor to the secretary of war, Simon Cameron.  In 1862, Stanton replaced the inefficient secretary.  As the War Department grew, Stanton organized it to run smoothly.  Stanton was effective in his new role and rigorously persecuted all officers suspected of being traitors.  He also issued an order to arrest anyone helping the South or hindering the Union cause.

Though they didn’t always see eye to eye, Stanton and Lincoln had mutual respect.  Lincoln once said of Stanton, “He is the rock on the beach of our national ocean against which the breakers dash and roar… without ceasing.  He fights back the angry waters and prevents them from undermining and overwhelming the land…  I do not see how he survives, why he is not crushed and torn to pieces.  Without him I should be destroyed.”

Upon Lincoln’s assassination in 1865, Stanton rushed to the scene and took charge.  When Lincoln died, Stanton famously stated, “Now he belongs to the ages.  There lies the most perfect ruler of men the world has ever seen.”  Stanton then oversaw the manhunt for John Wilkes Booth.

Stanton retained his position under President Andrew Johnson.  However, when he disagreed with Johnson’s Reconstruction policies, the president attempted to replace him.  Johnson was nearly impeached over the incident.  Stanton subsequently resigned to practice law.  He was later appointed to the Supreme Court by President Ulysses S. Grant, but died four days later on December 24, 1869.

Stanton has the honor of being the second person other than a president to appear on a US postage stamp (the first being Benjamin Franklin).  He was also pictured on US banknotes in 1890 and 1891.

 
 
Read More - Click Here


  • 2021 First-Class Forever Stamps - Star Wars Droids 2021 55¢ Star Wars Droids

    n 2021, the United States Postal Service released 10 new Forever stamps picturing Star Wars droids. The stamps were created to honor these characters and the positive influence they've had on people.  Order your set today.

    $10.95- $21.50
    BUY NOW
  • Major League Baseball In Stamps, Mint, Set of 5 Sheets, Grenada Major League Baseball Stamp Set
    Includes four mint stamp sheets. Each stamp features a portrait of the featured player, plus an action shot and team logo. Fun to own… and a terrific way to recall your memories of these baseball giants.  Act now and save $30.
    $19.95
    BUY NOW
  • 2001-11 Symbols of America, collection of 16 stamps 2001-11 Symbols of America, collection of 16 stamps
    Filling the gaps in your collection is easy with Mystic’s 2001-11 Symbols of America Set.  You’ll get 16 desirable stamps in one convenient step – saving you time and money. 
    $5.25- $17.50
    BUY NOW

 

U.S. #O76
1873 7¢ Stanton
Official Stamp – Treasury

Printed By: Continental Bank Note Co.
Printing Method: Engraved
Perforations:
12
Color: Brown
 
Official Mail stamps are genuine postage stamps, although they were never available at any post office.  These unique stamps are called Officials because their use was strictly limited to government mail.  Before 1873, government agencies had “franking” privileges.  This meant that government mail could be sent free of postage as long as it bore an authorized signature on the envelope.  As of July 1, 1873, “franking” privileges were discontinued and special official stamps were put into circulation for use on government mail.
 
Each department was issued its own set of stamps.  Many of the designs were taken from the current series of regular postage stamps being printed at that time - the so-called “Bank Note Issues.”  The department names were inscribed on the stamps instead of the usual “U.S. Postage” and each set was printed in its own distinct color.  Only the Post Office Department had its own unique design - a numeral in an oval frame.
 
In 1884, the Officials were declared obsolete and were replaced with the “penalty” envelope.  These envelopes were imprinted with an official emblem and carried a warning against unauthorized use by private individuals.
 

Birth Of Edwin Stanton

Edwin McMasters Stanton was born on December 19, 1814, Steubenville, Ohio.

As a child, Stanton attended private and seminary schools.  He suffered from severe asthma that prevented him from participating in strenuous physical activities.  So he took a great interest in books and poetry. 

After his father died, Stanton had to leave school to help earn money for the family.  He worked at a bookseller before briefly attending Kenyon College.  He was unable to finish his studies there because of his family’s financial woes.  So he returned to working in a book store.  Stanton then decided to study law.

After being admitted to the bar, Stanton opened a successful practice in Cadiz, Ohio, where he also worked with an anti-slavery society and wrote for and edited the local newspaper.  In 1837, he was made prosecutor of Harrison County.  Stanton soon grew more involved in politics and his law practice spread to Virginia and Pennsylvania.

In 1859, Stanton argued one of his most famous cases, serving as the defense attorney for Daniel E. Sickles.  Sickles was on trial for the murder of his wife’s lover, Philip Barton Key II (the son of Francis Scott Key).  Sickles was eventually acquitted after Stanton became one of the first US attorneys to use an insanity defense.

The following year, Stanton left his law practice when he was appointed attorney general under James Buchanan.  Stanton reportedly convinced Buchanan to drop his policy of secession tolerance and denounce it as illegal.

After Lincoln’s election to the presidency, he asked Stanton to become an advisor to the secretary of war, Simon Cameron.  In 1862, Stanton replaced the inefficient secretary.  As the War Department grew, Stanton organized it to run smoothly.  Stanton was effective in his new role and rigorously persecuted all officers suspected of being traitors.  He also issued an order to arrest anyone helping the South or hindering the Union cause.

Though they didn’t always see eye to eye, Stanton and Lincoln had mutual respect.  Lincoln once said of Stanton, “He is the rock on the beach of our national ocean against which the breakers dash and roar… without ceasing.  He fights back the angry waters and prevents them from undermining and overwhelming the land…  I do not see how he survives, why he is not crushed and torn to pieces.  Without him I should be destroyed.”

Upon Lincoln’s assassination in 1865, Stanton rushed to the scene and took charge.  When Lincoln died, Stanton famously stated, “Now he belongs to the ages.  There lies the most perfect ruler of men the world has ever seen.”  Stanton then oversaw the manhunt for John Wilkes Booth.

Stanton retained his position under President Andrew Johnson.  However, when he disagreed with Johnson’s Reconstruction policies, the president attempted to replace him.  Johnson was nearly impeached over the incident.  Stanton subsequently resigned to practice law.  He was later appointed to the Supreme Court by President Ulysses S. Grant, but died four days later on December 24, 1869.

Stanton has the honor of being the second person other than a president to appear on a US postage stamp (the first being Benjamin Franklin).  He was also pictured on US banknotes in 1890 and 1891.