#5607 – 2021 First-Class Forever Stamp - Sun Science: Coronal Hole

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                       U.S. #5607

2021 55¢ Sun Science – Coronal Hole


Value:  55¢ 1-ounce First-class rate (Forever)

Issue Date:  June 18, 2021

First Day City:  Greenbelt, MD

Type of Stamp:  Commemorative

Printed by:  Banknote Corporation of America

Printing Method:  Flexographic, Foil Stamping

Format:  Pane of 20

Self-Adhesive

Quantity Printed:  18,000,000

  The Sun's corona is a bright outer layer of plasma that reaches hundreds of thousands of miles into space.  Temperatures measure over 1.8 million degrees Fahrenheit in most areas, but there are some spots with lower temperatures.  When viewed under ultraviolet or x-rays, these areas appear darker than the surrounding corona and are thus nicknamed "coronal holes."  (In actuality, coronal holes are still incredibly bright and cannot be distinguished under visible light.)

The Sun's corona is constantly shifting and changing, which means so are coronal holes.  All of this is influenced by the Sun's magnetic fields.  The first coronal holes were observed in the 1960s.  They were viewed through x-ray imaging and also at radio wavelengths by the Sydney Chris Cross Radio Telescope.  However, scientists still didn't know what the phenomenon was.

In the 1970s, Skylab made history by using x-ray telescopes to shed some light on coronal holes.  This provided much greater data on the structure of the Sun's corona.  Since then, scientists have found that the coronal holes move to different areas during different parts of the 11-year solar cycle.  However, there is still much we don't understand about the science of the Sun's corona.  This poses a fun challenge for scientists everywhere – and job security!

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                       U.S. #5607

2021 55¢ Sun Science – Coronal Hole


Value:  55¢ 1-ounce First-class rate (Forever)

Issue Date:  June 18, 2021

First Day City:  Greenbelt, MD

Type of Stamp:  Commemorative

Printed by:  Banknote Corporation of America

Printing Method:  Flexographic, Foil Stamping

Format:  Pane of 20

Self-Adhesive

Quantity Printed:  18,000,000

 

The Sun's corona is a bright outer layer of plasma that reaches hundreds of thousands of miles into space.  Temperatures measure over 1.8 million degrees Fahrenheit in most areas, but there are some spots with lower temperatures.  When viewed under ultraviolet or x-rays, these areas appear darker than the surrounding corona and are thus nicknamed "coronal holes."  (In actuality, coronal holes are still incredibly bright and cannot be distinguished under visible light.)

The Sun's corona is constantly shifting and changing, which means so are coronal holes.  All of this is influenced by the Sun's magnetic fields.  The first coronal holes were observed in the 1960s.  They were viewed through x-ray imaging and also at radio wavelengths by the Sydney Chris Cross Radio Telescope.  However, scientists still didn't know what the phenomenon was.

In the 1970s, Skylab made history by using x-ray telescopes to shed some light on coronal holes.  This provided much greater data on the structure of the Sun's corona.  Since then, scientists have found that the coronal holes move to different areas during different parts of the 11-year solar cycle.  However, there is still much we don't understand about the science of the Sun's corona.  This poses a fun challenge for scientists everywhere – and job security!