#5557 – 2021 First-Class Forever Stamp - Chien-Shiung Wu

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U.S. #5557

2021 55¢ Chien-Shiung Wu


Value:  55¢ 1-ounce First-class rate (Forever)

Issue Date:  February 11, 2021

First Day City:  New York, NY

Type of Stamp:  Commemorative

Printed by:  Ashton Potter (USA) Ltd.

Printing Method:  Offset, microprint

Format:  Pane of 20

Self-Adhesive

Quantity Printed:  18,000,000

  Chien-Shiung Wu (May 31, 1912 – February 16, 1997) was a Chinese-American experimental physicist.  She is best known for her work in nuclear physics and her participation in the Manhattan Project.  In fact, she became a legend in the scientific community, with nicknames such as "First Lady of Physics," "Chinese Madame Curie," or Queen of Nuclear Research."

Chien-Shiung Wu was born in a small town called Liuhe in the Jiangsu province of China.  She was a star student from an early age and graduated high school at the top of her class.  She later attended National Central University (later renamed Nanjing University) and several other schools before traveling to the United States for her PhD.  Originally Wu planned to attend the University of Michigan, but changed her mind and instead enrolled in the University of California, Berkeley.

Wu thrived in America and earned her PhD in June 1940.  Four years later, she joined the Manhattan Project at Columbia University.  From there, she became a leading authority in the field of nuclear physics, overcoming prejudices stemming from both her race and gender.


Wu continued her research throughout her life.  Without Chien-Shiung Wu, we would likely not have the successs with nuclear energy that we do today.

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U.S. #5557

2021 55¢ Chien-Shiung Wu


Value:  55¢ 1-ounce First-class rate (Forever)

Issue Date:  February 11, 2021

First Day City:  New York, NY

Type of Stamp:  Commemorative

Printed by:  Ashton Potter (USA) Ltd.

Printing Method:  Offset, microprint

Format:  Pane of 20

Self-Adhesive

Quantity Printed:  18,000,000

 

Chien-Shiung Wu (May 31, 1912 – February 16, 1997) was a Chinese-American experimental physicist.  She is best known for her work in nuclear physics and her participation in the Manhattan Project.  In fact, she became a legend in the scientific community, with nicknames such as "First Lady of Physics," "Chinese Madame Curie," or Queen of Nuclear Research."

Chien-Shiung Wu was born in a small town called Liuhe in the Jiangsu province of China.  She was a star student from an early age and graduated high school at the top of her class.  She later attended National Central University (later renamed Nanjing University) and several other schools before traveling to the United States for her PhD.  Originally Wu planned to attend the University of Michigan, but changed her mind and instead enrolled in the University of California, Berkeley.

Wu thrived in America and earned her PhD in June 1940.  Four years later, she joined the Manhattan Project at Columbia University.  From there, she became a leading authority in the field of nuclear physics, overcoming prejudices stemming from both her race and gender.


Wu continued her research throughout her life.  Without Chien-Shiung Wu, we would likely not have the successs with nuclear energy that we do today.