#5550 – 2021 36c Barns (coil): Gambrel-Roofed Barn in Summer

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U.S. #5550

2021 36¢ Barns – Gambrel-Roofed Barn in Summer


Value:  36¢ Postcard rate (Forever)

Issue Date:  January 24, 2021

First Day City:  Barnesville, GA

Type of Stamp:  Commemorative

Printed by:  Banknote Corporation of America

Printing Method:  Offset

Format:  Coil of 100

Self-Adhesive

Quantity Printed:  400,000,000

  In America, when we think of barns, most of us picture what is known as a gambrel-roofed barn.  These symmetrical roofs have two slopes on each side, the lower ones at a sharper downward angle (also called a Dutch roof).  In the 1848 Dictionary of Americanisms, a gambrel was defined as "A hipped roof of a house, so called from the resemblance to the hind leg of a horse which by farriers is termed the gambrel."

Gambrel-roofed barns have been around for hundreds of years.  The first-known gambrel-roofed building in America was the second Harvard hall at Harvard university.  It was built in 1677.  Gambrel roofs later became popular for barns because they combined the qualities of a regular sloped roof with increased height.  This meant the greater space in the upper level of the barn had a much larger storage area than traditional barns.  This space would hold hay, grain, equipment, or anything else the farmer needed.

While many building techniques and designs have been introduced over the years, the gambrel-roofed barn remains popular.  When one sees a traditionally painted red and white gambrel-roofed barn, one can't help but feel a little nostalgic for days gone by.  These buildings dot the American countryside and are reminders of the importance of agriculture in our nation's development.

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U.S. #5550

2021 36¢ Barns – Gambrel-Roofed Barn in Summer


Value:  36¢ Postcard rate (Forever)

Issue Date:  January 24, 2021

First Day City:  Barnesville, GA

Type of Stamp:  Commemorative

Printed by:  Banknote Corporation of America

Printing Method:  Offset

Format:  Coil of 100

Self-Adhesive

Quantity Printed:  400,000,000

 

In America, when we think of barns, most of us picture what is known as a gambrel-roofed barn.  These symmetrical roofs have two slopes on each side, the lower ones at a sharper downward angle (also called a Dutch roof).  In the 1848 Dictionary of Americanisms, a gambrel was defined as "A hipped roof of a house, so called from the resemblance to the hind leg of a horse which by farriers is termed the gambrel."

Gambrel-roofed barns have been around for hundreds of years.  The first-known gambrel-roofed building in America was the second Harvard hall at Harvard university.  It was built in 1677.  Gambrel roofs later became popular for barns because they combined the qualities of a regular sloped roof with increased height.  This meant the greater space in the upper level of the barn had a much larger storage area than traditional barns.  This space would hold hay, grain, equipment, or anything else the farmer needed.

While many building techniques and designs have been introduced over the years, the gambrel-roofed barn remains popular.  When one sees a traditionally painted red and white gambrel-roofed barn, one can't help but feel a little nostalgic for days gone by.  These buildings dot the American countryside and are reminders of the importance of agriculture in our nation's development.