#5523 – 2020 First-Class Forever Stamp - 19th Amendment: Women Vote

Condition
Price
Qty
- Mint Stamp(s)
Ships in 1-2 business days.i$1.10
$1.10
- Used Single Stamp(s)
Ships in 1-2 business days.i$0.75
$0.75
4 More - Click Here
Mounts - Click Here
Condition
Price
Qty
- MM646215x49mm 15 Horizontal Strip Black Split-Back Mounts
Ships in 1-2 business days.i
$7.95
$7.95
- MM62232x47mm 50 Vertical Black Split-Back Mounts
Ships in 1-2 business days.i
$4.75
$4.75
- MM420932x47mm 50 Vertical Clear Bottom-Weld Mounts
Ships in 1-2 business days.i
$4.75
$4.75
U.S. #5523

2020 55¢ 19th Amendment: Women Vote


Value:  55¢ 1-ounce First-class rate (Forever)

Issue Date:  August 22, 2020

First Day City:  Seneca Falls, NY

Type of Stamp:  Commemorative

Printed by:  Banknote Corporation of America

Printing Method:  Offset, microprint

Format:  Pane of 20

Self-Adhesive

Quantity Printed:  30,000,000

  Some women spent their entire lives dedicated to adding the 19th Amendment to the United States Constitution.

Susan B. Anthony, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, and Lucretia Mott were essential in the beginning movement.  Their passion helped form the National Woman Suffrage Association and organize the first women's rights convention, known as the "Seneca Falls Convention," in NY.  They paved the way for the next generation of strong-minded women to continue their legacy.

Carrie Chapman Catt, Alice Paul, and Lucy Burns took the reins around 1910.  Paul and Burns organized political protests and started picketing the White House in 1917.  Even though they received the support of President Wilson a year later, the picketing continued until the House of Representatives passed the amendment in 1919.


On August 18, 1920, over 65 years of hard work paid off.  Tennessee was the 36th and final state they need for the 19th Amendment to be ratified.  In 2020, the US Post Office issued a commemorative stamp to honor this important centennial.  Although many different approaches were used, their goal was always the same – women's right to vote.

Read More - Click Here


  • Latvia Map Stamps - Imperforate block of 16 with map on reverse, one imperforate single plus FREE album page and mounts Latvia Map Stamps

    Own rare World War I stamp artifacts most collectors have never even seen.  The first stamps of Latvia – printed on German military maps over 100 years ago. Order yours today!

    $36.95
    BUY NOW
  • Legends of Baseball, Artcraft First Day Portraits, Set of 5 Legends of Baseball First Day Cover Set
    This set includes five special-edition First Day Covers featuring the 2000 Legends of Baseball US stamps. Each cover was canceled on the stamps' first day of issue and includes a large vintage photograph of the baseball player pictured on the stamp. Order yours today!
    $29.95
    BUY NOW
  • Legends of Hollywood Full Pane Cover Mix - selections may vary Legends of Hollywood Full Pan Cover Mix
    These panes are really neat – they feature additional images of each star plus a brief biography.  These full pane covers were produced in small numbers. Selections vary – let us choose five covers to add to your collection today.
    $49.95
    BUY NOW

U.S. #5523

2020 55¢ 19th Amendment: Women Vote


Value:  55¢ 1-ounce First-class rate (Forever)

Issue Date:  August 22, 2020

First Day City:  Seneca Falls, NY

Type of Stamp:  Commemorative

Printed by:  Banknote Corporation of America

Printing Method:  Offset, microprint

Format:  Pane of 20

Self-Adhesive

Quantity Printed:  30,000,000

 

Some women spent their entire lives dedicated to adding the 19th Amendment to the United States Constitution.

Susan B. Anthony, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, and Lucretia Mott were essential in the beginning movement.  Their passion helped form the National Woman Suffrage Association and organize the first women's rights convention, known as the "Seneca Falls Convention," in NY.  They paved the way for the next generation of strong-minded women to continue their legacy.

Carrie Chapman Catt, Alice Paul, and Lucy Burns took the reins around 1910.  Paul and Burns organized political protests and started picketing the White House in 1917.  Even though they received the support of President Wilson a year later, the picketing continued until the House of Representatives passed the amendment in 1919.


On August 18, 1920, over 65 years of hard work paid off.  Tennessee was the 36th and final state they need for the 19th Amendment to be ratified.  In 2020, the US Post Office issued a commemorative stamp to honor this important centennial.  Although many different approaches were used, their goal was always the same – women's right to vote.