#5454 – 2020 First-Class Forever Stamp - Wild Orchids (booklet): Calopogon tuberosus

Condition
Price
Qty
- Mint Stamp(s)
Ships in 1-2 business days.i$1.40
$1.40
- Used Single Stamp(s)
Ships in 1-2 business days.i$0.50
$0.50
Mounts - Click Here
Condition
Price
Qty
- MM642215x41mm 15 Horizontal Strip Black Split-Back Mounts
Ships in 1-2 business days.i
$7.95
$7.95
- MM215532x41mm 25 Vertical Black Split-Back Mounts
Ships in 1-2 business days.i
$2.25
$2.25
               U.S. #5454

2020 55¢ Calopogon Tuberosus (Grass Pink Orchid)

Value:  55¢ 1-ounce First-class rate (Forever)
Issue Date:  February 21, 2020
First Day City:  Coral Gables, FL
Type of Stamp:  Definitive
Printed by:  Banknote Corporation of America
Printing Method:  Offset
Format:  Double-sided booklet of 20
Self-Adhesive
Quantity Printed:  500,000,000
 
When it comes to wildflowers, few are as striking as orchids.  Their unusual structures, vivid patterns, and bright colors bring natural beauty to any environment.  While the most famous varieties are native to the tropics, there are many native to North America, too.

One of the most widely occurring orchid species in North America is Calopogon tuberosus – the "grass pink" orchid.  It is found in bogs, meadows, swamps, and other wetland habitats throughout the eastern half of the United States and Canada.  The plant earned its name from its grass-like leaves and magenta or pink flowers.  Grass pink orchids are up to two and a quarter feet tall with grass-like leaves up to a foot long.  The flowers grow from a central stem (also known as a spike) and number from two to 15 blooms per plant.

Grass pink orchids are pollinated primarily by bumblebees and other large long-tongued bees.  Other pollinators may be attracted to the flowers, but their size and shape rarely allows them to transfer pollen.  While most orchid flowers have the same orientation, the grass pink orchid's blooms appear upside down when compared.  While not completely invulnerable, the grass pink orchid has remained relatively untouched by environmental threats.  It is likely they will be around for everyone to enjoy for generations to come.


 
Read More - Click Here


  • 2021 First-Class Forever Stamps - Garden Beauty 2021 First Class Forever Stamps - Garden Beauty

    In 2021, the United States Postal Service anticipated the arrival of spring with a new set of 10 Forever stamps honoring Garden Beauty.  Order yours today!

    $10.95- $64.95
    BUY NOW
  • Pre 1900 Fancy Cancels  May Include Targets, Stars, Numbers, or Grids. Set of 5 with small imperfections Pre 1900 Fancy Cancels
    Since they first appeared in the 19th century, fancy cancels have been extremely sought-after by collectors.  Act now to add five of these to your collection.  Stamps may vary, but that's half the fun!
    $12.95
    BUY NOW
  • 1950s First Day Covers, Collection of 100 1950s First Day Covers, Collection of 100
    Some of the stamps I saw in my set of 100 covers honored the American flag, Alexander Hamilton, Religious Freedom, Overland Mail, NATO, and more.  This money saving offer saves you over $90!  Order your set today.
    $89.95
    BUY NOW

               U.S. #5454

2020 55¢ Calopogon Tuberosus (Grass Pink Orchid)

Value:  55¢ 1-ounce First-class rate (Forever)
Issue Date:  February 21, 2020
First Day City:  Coral Gables, FL
Type of Stamp:  Definitive
Printed by:  Banknote Corporation of America
Printing Method:  Offset
Format:  Double-sided booklet of 20
Self-Adhesive
Quantity Printed:  500,000,000
 

When it comes to wildflowers, few are as striking as orchids.  Their unusual structures, vivid patterns, and bright colors bring natural beauty to any environment.  While the most famous varieties are native to the tropics, there are many native to North America, too.

One of the most widely occurring orchid species in North America is Calopogon tuberosus – the "grass pink" orchid.  It is found in bogs, meadows, swamps, and other wetland habitats throughout the eastern half of the United States and Canada.  The plant earned its name from its grass-like leaves and magenta or pink flowers.  Grass pink orchids are up to two and a quarter feet tall with grass-like leaves up to a foot long.  The flowers grow from a central stem (also known as a spike) and number from two to 15 blooms per plant.

Grass pink orchids are pollinated primarily by bumblebees and other large long-tongued bees.  Other pollinators may be attracted to the flowers, but their size and shape rarely allows them to transfer pollen.  While most orchid flowers have the same orientation, the grass pink orchid's blooms appear upside down when compared.  While not completely invulnerable, the grass pink orchid has remained relatively untouched by environmental threats.  It is likely they will be around for everyone to enjoy for generations to come.