#5392 – 2019 First-Class Forever Stamp - USS Missouri

Condition
Price
Qty
- Mint Stamp(s)
Ships in 1-2 business days.i$2.25
$2.25
- Used Single Stamp(s)
Ships in 1-2 business days.i$0.30
$0.30
6 More - Click Here
Mounts - Click Here
Condition
Price
Qty
- MM6162160x220mm 1 Vertical Black Split-Back Mount
Ships in 1-2 business days.i
$6.95
$6.95
- MM646215x49mm 15 Horizontal Strip Black Split-Back Mounts
Ships in 1-2 business days.i
$7.95
$7.95
- MM62232x47mm 50 Vertical Black Split-Back Mounts
Ships in 1-2 business days.i
$4.75
$4.75
- MM420932x47mm 50 Vertical Clear Bottom-Weld Mounts
Ships in 1-2 business days.i
$4.75
$4.75

U.S. #5392

2019 55¢ USS Missouri 

Value:  55¢ 1-ounce First-class rate (Forever)
Issue Date:  June 11, 2019
First Day City:  Honolulu, HI
Type of Stamp:  Commemorative
Printed by:  Banknote Corporation of America
Printing Method:  Offset, Microprint
Format:  Pane of 20
Self-Adhesive
Quantity Printed:  20,000,000
 
On June 11, 1944, the USS Missouri (BB-63) was commissioned as America's last battleship.  In 2019, the USPS celebrated the "Mighty Mo" and its 75th anniversary with the issue of a new forever stamp featuring an illustration by Dan Cosgrove.  It pictures the Missouri as she appeared at her time of commission.  The battleship served in several actions during her career including World War II, the Korean War, and Operation Desert Storm.  The Missouri's most famous role was hosting the official ceremony in which Japan surrendered to the Allies, ending World War II. The USS Missouri was built at the Brooklyn Navy Yard from January 6, 1941, to January 29, 1944.  She was the last of four Iowa-class ships commissioned by the US Navy.  The ship was outfitted with nine 16"/50 caliber Mark 7 guns, 20 5"/38 caliber guns in twin turrets, 49 Oerlikon 20 mm anti-aircraft guns, and 80 Bofors 40 mm anti-aircraft guns.  The ship measured 887 feet, 3 inches long, could reach speeds up to 32.7 knots, and was crewed by 1,851 men. As the last great American battleship, the USS Missouri represents the nostalgia of a bygone era.  She was awarded three battle stars for actions during World War II, five for the Korean War, and three for the Gulf War.  Today, the Missouri is a museum ship of Pearl Harbor, a fitting retirement for a lifetime of defending her country.  

Victory Over Japan Day

1995 32¢ World War II: News of Victory Hits Home stamp
US #2981i pictures one of the most famous scenes of celebration that broke out when Japan announced its surrender.

On September 2, 1945, Japan formally surrendered to the Allies aboard the USS Missouri.  This is celebrated as V-J Day in the US.  Many other countries celebrate V-J Day on August 15, when Japan announced its surrender.

1995 32¢ Truman announces Japan's Surrender stamp
US #2981h depicts President Truman’s announcement of Japan’s surrender.

By the summer of 1945 the Allies were preparing to invade the Japanese mainland.  Some historians have estimated one million US casualties would be incurred in this invasion, which was planned for November of 1945.  Japanese losses would have been much higher.

1971 6¢ General Douglas MacArthur stamp
US #1424 – MacArthur accepted and signed the surrender on behalf of the Allied Powers.

In 1942 the Manhattan Project, a top-secret program to develop an atomic bomb, was launched.  Shortly after the defeat of Germany, in July of 1945, the first bomb was tested in New Mexico.  The US, Great Britain, and China issued an ultimatum to Japan – surrender unconditionally or be destroyed.  Unfortunately, the Japanese chose to fight on.

2019 55¢ USS Missouri stamp
US #5392 – The official Japanese surrender occurred aboard the Missouri.

On August 6, 1945, a B-29 bomber called the Enola Gay dropped an atomic bomb on the city of Hiroshima, killing an estimated 70,000 to 125,000 civilians and 20,000 soldiers.  The Japanese still did not respond, so a second bomb was dropped on Nagasaki on August 9th; 40,000 to 60,000 perished, almost all civilians.  (20 prisoners of war, including 12 Americans, were also killed in the bombings).  The following day, the Japanese government announced it intended to surrender under the terms set by the Potsdam Declaration, and issued a formal announcement of acceptance on August 15.

1985 50¢ Great Americans: Chester W. Nimitz stamp
US #1869 – Nimitz signed on behalf of the US.

Celebrations broke out around the world as early as August 10, with soldiers dancing in the streets in Paris, and shouting “It’s over in the Pacific and in Berlin.”  In China they shot of fireworks and in Manila they sang “God Bless America.”  In Okinawa, several people were killed and injured as soldiers fired every weapon they could find into the sky.

1953 5¢ Opening of Japan Centennial stamp
US #1021 – One of the flags aboard the Missouri on this day was the same one that flew over the USS Powhatan when Matthew C. Perry first visited Japan in 1853.

President Harry Truman appeared in a nationwide broadcast on August 14 announcing the surrender, but stating that “the proclamation of V-J Day must wait upon the formal signing of the surrender terms by Japan” on September 2.

1945 V-J Day Commemorative Postcard
Item #570294B – V-J Day commemorative postcard canceled on the day of the surrender.

The Allies officially began their occupation of Japan on August 28.  MacArthur arrived two days later and decreed that no Allied soldiers should harm the Japanese or eat their food.  The formal surrender ceremony occurred at about 9 a.m. on September 2, 1945, aboard the USS Missouri in Tokyo Bay.  Representatives of the Japanese Empire signed the Japanese Instrument of Surrender.  MacArthur signed for the Allied nations, followed by Chester W. Nimitz.  Members from eight other Allied nations then signed the documents.

1995-2005 Victory Over Japan Celebration - 2 FDCs and 2 Souvenir Sheets (10 stamps)
Item #M12323 – Stamp and cover set honoring V-E Day and V-J Day.

In the days that followed, similar surrender ceremonies occurred throughout the Pacific on Japanese-held land.  The state of war between the Allies and Japan officially ended with the Treaty of San Francisco on April 28, 1952.

 
Read More - Click Here


  • Latvia Map Stamps - Imperforate block of 16 with map on reverse, one imperforate single plus FREE album page and mounts Latvia Map Stamps

    Own rare World War I stamp artifacts most collectors have never even seen.  The first stamps of Latvia – printed on German military maps over 100 years ago. Order yours today!

    $36.95
    BUY NOW
  • Legends of Baseball, Artcraft First Day Portraits, Set of 5 Legends of Baseball First Day Cover Set
    This set includes five special-edition First Day Covers featuring the 2000 Legends of Baseball US stamps. Each cover was canceled on the stamps' first day of issue and includes a large vintage photograph of the baseball player pictured on the stamp. Order yours today!
    $29.95
    BUY NOW
  • Legends of Hollywood Full Pane Cover Mix - selections may vary Legends of Hollywood Full Pan Cover Mix
    These panes are really neat – they feature additional images of each star plus a brief biography.  These full pane covers were produced in small numbers. Selections vary – let us choose five covers to add to your collection today.
    $49.95
    BUY NOW

U.S. #5392

2019 55¢ USS Missouri 

Value:  55¢ 1-ounce First-class rate (Forever)
Issue Date:  June 11, 2019
First Day City:  Honolulu, HI
Type of Stamp:  Commemorative
Printed by:  Banknote Corporation of America
Printing Method:  Offset, Microprint
Format:  Pane of 20
Self-Adhesive
Quantity Printed:  20,000,000
 

On June 11, 1944, the USS Missouri (BB-63) was commissioned as America's last battleship.  In 2019, the USPS celebrated the "Mighty Mo" and its 75th anniversary with the issue of a new forever stamp featuring an illustration by Dan Cosgrove.  It pictures the Missouri as she appeared at her time of commission.  The battleship served in several actions during her career including World War II, the Korean War, and Operation Desert Storm.  The Missouri's most famous role was hosting the official ceremony in which Japan surrendered to the Allies, ending World War II.

The USS Missouri was built at the Brooklyn Navy Yard from January 6, 1941, to January 29, 1944.  She was the last of four Iowa-class ships commissioned by the US Navy.  The ship was outfitted with nine 16"/50 caliber Mark 7 guns, 20 5"/38 caliber guns in twin turrets, 49 Oerlikon 20 mm anti-aircraft guns, and 80 Bofors 40 mm anti-aircraft guns.  The ship measured 887 feet, 3 inches long, could reach speeds up to 32.7 knots, and was crewed by 1,851 men.

As the last great American battleship, the USS Missouri represents the nostalgia of a bygone era.  She was awarded three battle stars for actions during World War II, five for the Korean War, and three for the Gulf War.  Today, the Missouri is a museum ship of Pearl Harbor, a fitting retirement for a lifetime of defending her country.

 

Victory Over Japan Day

1995 32¢ World War II: News of Victory Hits Home stamp
US #2981i pictures one of the most famous scenes of celebration that broke out when Japan announced its surrender.

On September 2, 1945, Japan formally surrendered to the Allies aboard the USS Missouri.  This is celebrated as V-J Day in the US.  Many other countries celebrate V-J Day on August 15, when Japan announced its surrender.

1995 32¢ Truman announces Japan's Surrender stamp
US #2981h depicts President Truman’s announcement of Japan’s surrender.

By the summer of 1945 the Allies were preparing to invade the Japanese mainland.  Some historians have estimated one million US casualties would be incurred in this invasion, which was planned for November of 1945.  Japanese losses would have been much higher.

1971 6¢ General Douglas MacArthur stamp
US #1424 – MacArthur accepted and signed the surrender on behalf of the Allied Powers.

In 1942 the Manhattan Project, a top-secret program to develop an atomic bomb, was launched.  Shortly after the defeat of Germany, in July of 1945, the first bomb was tested in New Mexico.  The US, Great Britain, and China issued an ultimatum to Japan – surrender unconditionally or be destroyed.  Unfortunately, the Japanese chose to fight on.

2019 55¢ USS Missouri stamp
US #5392 – The official Japanese surrender occurred aboard the Missouri.

On August 6, 1945, a B-29 bomber called the Enola Gay dropped an atomic bomb on the city of Hiroshima, killing an estimated 70,000 to 125,000 civilians and 20,000 soldiers.  The Japanese still did not respond, so a second bomb was dropped on Nagasaki on August 9th; 40,000 to 60,000 perished, almost all civilians.  (20 prisoners of war, including 12 Americans, were also killed in the bombings).  The following day, the Japanese government announced it intended to surrender under the terms set by the Potsdam Declaration, and issued a formal announcement of acceptance on August 15.

1985 50¢ Great Americans: Chester W. Nimitz stamp
US #1869 – Nimitz signed on behalf of the US.

Celebrations broke out around the world as early as August 10, with soldiers dancing in the streets in Paris, and shouting “It’s over in the Pacific and in Berlin.”  In China they shot of fireworks and in Manila they sang “God Bless America.”  In Okinawa, several people were killed and injured as soldiers fired every weapon they could find into the sky.

1953 5¢ Opening of Japan Centennial stamp
US #1021 – One of the flags aboard the Missouri on this day was the same one that flew over the USS Powhatan when Matthew C. Perry first visited Japan in 1853.

President Harry Truman appeared in a nationwide broadcast on August 14 announcing the surrender, but stating that “the proclamation of V-J Day must wait upon the formal signing of the surrender terms by Japan” on September 2.

1945 V-J Day Commemorative Postcard
Item #570294B – V-J Day commemorative postcard canceled on the day of the surrender.

The Allies officially began their occupation of Japan on August 28.  MacArthur arrived two days later and decreed that no Allied soldiers should harm the Japanese or eat their food.  The formal surrender ceremony occurred at about 9 a.m. on September 2, 1945, aboard the USS Missouri in Tokyo Bay.  Representatives of the Japanese Empire signed the Japanese Instrument of Surrender.  MacArthur signed for the Allied nations, followed by Chester W. Nimitz.  Members from eight other Allied nations then signed the documents.

1995-2005 Victory Over Japan Celebration - 2 FDCs and 2 Souvenir Sheets (10 stamps)
Item #M12323 – Stamp and cover set honoring V-E Day and V-J Day.

In the days that followed, similar surrender ceremonies occurred throughout the Pacific on Japanese-held land.  The state of war between the Allies and Japan officially ended with the Treaty of San Francisco on April 28, 1952.