#5136 – 2016 68c Eastern Tailed-Blue Butterfly

Condition
Price
Qty
- Mint Stamp(s)
Ships in 1-2 business days.i$2.75
$2.75
- Used Single Stamp(s)
Ships in 1-2 business days.i$1.95
$1.95
5 More - Click Here
Mounts - Click Here
Condition
Price
Qty
- MM641215x38mm 25 Horizontal Strip Black Split-Back Mounts
Ships in 1-2 business days.i
$7.95
$7.95
- MM214238x38mm 15 Black Split-Back Mounts
Ships in 1-2 business days.i
$1.50
$1.50
U.S. #5136
2016 68c Eastern Tailed-Blue Butterfly

Eastern tailed-blues are one of North America’s most boldly colored species of butterfly.  They have small, thin tails and a wingspan of about an inch.  Male butterflies are iridescent blue on the inside of their wings while females are a lighter blue, brown, or gray.  Both sexes have two or three orange spots on their bottom wings and are bluish-white on the outside of their wings.

Like other butterflies in the Lycaenidae family, the eastern tailed-blue has a mutually beneficial relationship with ants.  As a caterpillar, it eats buds, flowers, and seeds, and secretes a substance called honeydew.  This sugary liquid attracts ants that protect the caterpillar from predators.  Sometimes the ants will defend the caterpillar even after it pupates. 

Adult eastern tailed-blue butterflies like open areas with plenty of light.  They drink nectar from the flowers of plants such as sweet clover and wild strawberry.  The eastern tailed-blues can be seen perching on leaves or stems to bask in the sun.  Unlike most butterflies, which keep their wings closed while resting, eastern tailed-blues rest them at a 45 degree angle.

Eastern tailed-blue butterflies used to only be found in eastern North America, but can now be admired in new areas – like California.  Its adaptability means this vibrant butterfly will be around for many years to come.
 

Butterfly Series

On May 17, 2010, the USPS issued the first stamp in the Butterfly Series.

In late 2009, the USPS unveiled the first butterfly stamp for greeting card envelopes that required additional postage (an extra 20¢) than the standard one-ounce rate covered.  This would apply to envelopes that couldn’t be sorted on the USPS’s automated equipment, otherwise known as “nonmachinable.”

Some of these nonmachinable envelopes include those that are oddly-shaped or vertical, lumpy, rigid, or with clasps, ribbons, or buttons on them.  Even if an envelope weighed less than one ounce, but was unmachinable, it would need this stamp.  However, letters that were simply heavy didn’t necessarily need it.  The two-ounce rate at the time was 61¢, and this stamp was 64¢, so they would be overpaying by 3¢ if they used it.

The USPS worked closely with the greeting card industry on this new stamp.  Prior to this issue, some greeting card envelopes would be imprinted with “extra postage required.”  With the creation of this new stamp, the Greeting Card Association encouraged its members to print a butterfly silhouette on the envelopes of cards that would require this additional postage.  Reflecting this close working relationship, the 64¢ monarch butterfly stamp was issued on May 17, 2010, at the National Stationery Show held at the Jacob Javits Center in New York.

The monarch stamp remained in use for two years, being replaced by the Baltimore checkerspot butterfly stamp in 2012 when the nonmachinable rate increased to 65¢.  New stamps were issued each year through 2016.  The 2015 and 2016 followed the Forever format, in printing “non-machinable surcharge” on the stamp, rather than the actual denomination.

The California dogface butterfly stamp was initially announced in 2016 and expected for a 2017 release.  However, the USPS said that they had designed the stamp, but wouldn’t produce it until supplies of existing butterfly stamps were nearly depleted.  So that stamp wasn’t issued until 2019.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Click here to view lots more US and worldwide butterfly stamps.

 
Read More - Click Here


  • 2021 First-Class Forever Stamps - Garden Beauty 2021 First Class Forever Stamps - Garden Beauty

    In 2021, the United States Postal Service anticipated the arrival of spring with a new set of 10 Forever stamps honoring Garden Beauty.  Order yours today!

    $10.95- $64.95
    BUY NOW
  • Pre 1900 Fancy Cancels  May Include Targets, Stars, Numbers, or Grids. Set of 5 with small imperfections Pre 1900 Fancy Cancels
    Since they first appeared in the 19th century, fancy cancels have been extremely sought-after by collectors.  Act now to add five of these to your collection.  Stamps may vary, but that's half the fun!
    $12.95
    BUY NOW
  • 1950s First Day Covers, Collection of 100 1950s First Day Covers, Collection of 100
    Some of the stamps I saw in my set of 100 covers honored the American flag, Alexander Hamilton, Religious Freedom, Overland Mail, NATO, and more.  This money saving offer saves you over $90!  Order your set today.
    $89.95
    BUY NOW

U.S. #5136
2016 68c Eastern Tailed-Blue Butterfly

Eastern tailed-blues are one of North America’s most boldly colored species of butterfly.  They have small, thin tails and a wingspan of about an inch.  Male butterflies are iridescent blue on the inside of their wings while females are a lighter blue, brown, or gray.  Both sexes have two or three orange spots on their bottom wings and are bluish-white on the outside of their wings.

Like other butterflies in the Lycaenidae family, the eastern tailed-blue has a mutually beneficial relationship with ants.  As a caterpillar, it eats buds, flowers, and seeds, and secretes a substance called honeydew.  This sugary liquid attracts ants that protect the caterpillar from predators.  Sometimes the ants will defend the caterpillar even after it pupates. 

Adult eastern tailed-blue butterflies like open areas with plenty of light.  They drink nectar from the flowers of plants such as sweet clover and wild strawberry.  The eastern tailed-blues can be seen perching on leaves or stems to bask in the sun.  Unlike most butterflies, which keep their wings closed while resting, eastern tailed-blues rest them at a 45 degree angle.

Eastern tailed-blue butterflies used to only be found in eastern North America, but can now be admired in new areas – like California.  Its adaptability means this vibrant butterfly will be around for many years to come.
 

Butterfly Series

On May 17, 2010, the USPS issued the first stamp in the Butterfly Series.

In late 2009, the USPS unveiled the first butterfly stamp for greeting card envelopes that required additional postage (an extra 20¢) than the standard one-ounce rate covered.  This would apply to envelopes that couldn’t be sorted on the USPS’s automated equipment, otherwise known as “nonmachinable.”

Some of these nonmachinable envelopes include those that are oddly-shaped or vertical, lumpy, rigid, or with clasps, ribbons, or buttons on them.  Even if an envelope weighed less than one ounce, but was unmachinable, it would need this stamp.  However, letters that were simply heavy didn’t necessarily need it.  The two-ounce rate at the time was 61¢, and this stamp was 64¢, so they would be overpaying by 3¢ if they used it.

The USPS worked closely with the greeting card industry on this new stamp.  Prior to this issue, some greeting card envelopes would be imprinted with “extra postage required.”  With the creation of this new stamp, the Greeting Card Association encouraged its members to print a butterfly silhouette on the envelopes of cards that would require this additional postage.  Reflecting this close working relationship, the 64¢ monarch butterfly stamp was issued on May 17, 2010, at the National Stationery Show held at the Jacob Javits Center in New York.

The monarch stamp remained in use for two years, being replaced by the Baltimore checkerspot butterfly stamp in 2012 when the nonmachinable rate increased to 65¢.  New stamps were issued each year through 2016.  The 2015 and 2016 followed the Forever format, in printing “non-machinable surcharge” on the stamp, rather than the actual denomination.

The California dogface butterfly stamp was initially announced in 2016 and expected for a 2017 release.  However, the USPS said that they had designed the stamp, but wouldn’t produce it until supplies of existing butterfly stamps were nearly depleted.  So that stamp wasn’t issued until 2019.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Click here to view lots more US and worldwide butterfly stamps.