#4927a – 2014 $5.75 Imperf Glade Creek Grist Mill

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U.S. #4927a

2014 $5.75 Glade Creek Grist Mill Imperforate

Priority Mail

 

This stamp was issued to pay the priority mail rate. It pictures West Virginia’s Glade Creek Grist Mill and is part of the American Landmarks Series.

 

At the turn of the 20th century, over 500 mills dotted the banks of West Virginia’s rivers and streams. As time progressed so did industry, leaving traditional milling to history. But today, the Glade Creek Grist Mill offers a glimpse into the grain-grinding operations of days gone by.

 

Located in Babcock State Park, the mill is a replica of the old Cooper’s Mill that once stood nearby. Built in 1976, the fully operational mill seems relatively young, but its walls tell a different story. The structure was created using parts from defunct old mills from around the state. The basic structure came from a 19th-century gristmill, just a couple counties over. The waterwheel was salvaged from a burned-out mill near Petersburg, and other parts came from similar old mills in West Virginia.

 

The entire building radiates a sense of history. The rushing water of the creek turns the groaning waterwheel, powering the heavy grindstones. Just as it would have been done 100 years ago, a miller carefully monitors the delicate process from start to finish.

 

Some lucky mill guests might be able to purchase freshly milled cornmeal or buckwheat flour. But all visitors to the Glade Creek Grist Mill get to witness the fascinating milling methods of yesteryear.

 

The illustration for this stamp was made by Dan Cosgrove. He first produced art for the U.S. Postal Service in 2009 and has created the art for the Express Mail (now Priority Mail Express) and Priority Mail stamps since then.

 

$5.75 Glade Creek Grist Mill, issued to satisfy the Priority Mail rate

Issue Date: September 29, 2014

City: Danese, WV

Category: Definitive

Printed By: Ashton Potter (USA) Ltd.

Printing Method: Lithographed printing in sheets of 60 with six panes of 10 per sheet

Perforations: Imperforate

Self-adhesive

 

Scarce Modern Imperforates

The modern imperforate stamps are one of the hottest stories around.  In 2012, the U.S. Postal Service released some issues as press sheets.  The sheets with die cut perforations were issued in limited quantities. 

 

To the surprise of many collectors, officials then issued a small number of press sheets without perforations.  The uncut sheets were only available in Kansas City, Missouri, yet most sold out immediately.  In an instant, the imperforate stamp sheets became modern rarities.  For example, only 75,000 Baseball All-Star se-tenant sheets were issued compared to 118,000 Bugs Bunny sheets with the 10th stamp imperforate.

 

In a controversial move, the editors of Scott Catalogue announced they would not list or give numbers to these stamps because they did not fit Scott guidelines.  This decision was strongly debated since the imperforate stamps are valid for postage.  They eventually decided to give the stamps minor numbers and have continued issuing imperforates in the years since.

 

Because they were issued in such limited quantities, these scarce modern imperforates can be difficult to find.  Luckily Mystic purchased a small number of each imperforate stamp issued so you can add these modern rarities to your collection.  Be one of the lucky few – order today. 

 

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U.S. #4927a

2014 $5.75 Glade Creek Grist Mill Imperforate

Priority Mail

 

This stamp was issued to pay the priority mail rate. It pictures West Virginia’s Glade Creek Grist Mill and is part of the American Landmarks Series.

 

At the turn of the 20th century, over 500 mills dotted the banks of West Virginia’s rivers and streams. As time progressed so did industry, leaving traditional milling to history. But today, the Glade Creek Grist Mill offers a glimpse into the grain-grinding operations of days gone by.

 

Located in Babcock State Park, the mill is a replica of the old Cooper’s Mill that once stood nearby. Built in 1976, the fully operational mill seems relatively young, but its walls tell a different story. The structure was created using parts from defunct old mills from around the state. The basic structure came from a 19th-century gristmill, just a couple counties over. The waterwheel was salvaged from a burned-out mill near Petersburg, and other parts came from similar old mills in West Virginia.

 

The entire building radiates a sense of history. The rushing water of the creek turns the groaning waterwheel, powering the heavy grindstones. Just as it would have been done 100 years ago, a miller carefully monitors the delicate process from start to finish.

 

Some lucky mill guests might be able to purchase freshly milled cornmeal or buckwheat flour. But all visitors to the Glade Creek Grist Mill get to witness the fascinating milling methods of yesteryear.

 

The illustration for this stamp was made by Dan Cosgrove. He first produced art for the U.S. Postal Service in 2009 and has created the art for the Express Mail (now Priority Mail Express) and Priority Mail stamps since then.

 

$5.75 Glade Creek Grist Mill, issued to satisfy the Priority Mail rate

Issue Date: September 29, 2014

City: Danese, WV

Category: Definitive

Printed By: Ashton Potter (USA) Ltd.

Printing Method: Lithographed printing in sheets of 60 with six panes of 10 per sheet

Perforations: Imperforate

Self-adhesive

 

Scarce Modern Imperforates

The modern imperforate stamps are one of the hottest stories around.  In 2012, the U.S. Postal Service released some issues as press sheets.  The sheets with die cut perforations were issued in limited quantities. 

 

To the surprise of many collectors, officials then issued a small number of press sheets without perforations.  The uncut sheets were only available in Kansas City, Missouri, yet most sold out immediately.  In an instant, the imperforate stamp sheets became modern rarities.  For example, only 75,000 Baseball All-Star se-tenant sheets were issued compared to 118,000 Bugs Bunny sheets with the 10th stamp imperforate.

 

In a controversial move, the editors of Scott Catalogue announced they would not list or give numbers to these stamps because they did not fit Scott guidelines.  This decision was strongly debated since the imperforate stamps are valid for postage.  They eventually decided to give the stamps minor numbers and have continued issuing imperforates in the years since.

 

Because they were issued in such limited quantities, these scarce modern imperforates can be difficult to find.  Luckily Mystic purchased a small number of each imperforate stamp issued so you can add these modern rarities to your collection.  Be one of the lucky few – order today.