#4894 – 2014 First-Class Forever Stamp - Red, White and Blue: Flag with 5 Full and 3 Partial Stars

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U.S. #4894
2014 49¢ Flag With 5 Full and 3 Partial Stars
Red, White, and Blue 
 
The U.S. Postal Service describes this stamp as a “modern interpretation of a flying flag” with six stripes and “handful” of stars. Each of the four stamp designs has a different number of complete stars. They were issued in coils of 10,000 for business use.
 
One April day in 1976, a man and his 11-year-old son ran onto the field of Los Angeles’ Dodger Stadium. The man spread out an American flag on the grass and doused it in gasoline. Lighter in hand, he was about to set our nation’s most cherished symbol on fire.
 
Suddenly, Chicago Cubs outfielder Rick Monday sprinted over, rescuing the flag just seconds before it would have met a fiery fate. Silent up until that point, the crowd then stood, began cheering, and singing “God Bless America.” 
 
Dodger manager and World War II veteran Tommy Lasorda witnessed the event. “It was the greatest heroic act that’s ever happened on a baseball field. He protected the symbol of everything that we live for. And the symbol that we live in the greatest country in the world.”
 
Monday, a Marine Corps Reserves veteran, recalled, “If you’re going to burn the flag, don’t do it around me. I’ve been to too many veterans’ hospitals and seen too many broken bodies of guys who tried to protect it.” Monday turned down a $1 million offer to buy the flag, stating, “That little piece of cloth represents a lot of rights and freedoms that people have given up their lives to protect... But the flag is not for sale. What this flag represents, you can’t buy.” 
 
The stamps were designed by Ethel Kessler. Her inspiration came from patriotic pins and flags of the 20th century. She has been an art director with the U.S. Postal Service since 1997 and has been involved in the creation of about 80 stamps.
 
49¢ Red, White & Blue, issued to satisfy the first-class mail rate
Issue Date: April 25, 2014
City: San Francisco, CA, at the WESTPEX Stamp Show
Category: Definitive
Quantity: 37,500,000
Printed By: CCL Labels Inc.
Printing Method: Photogravure
Perforations: Serpentine Die Cut 11 Vertical
Self-adhesive
 
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U.S. #4894
2014 49¢ Flag With 5 Full and 3 Partial Stars
Red, White, and Blue 
 
The U.S. Postal Service describes this stamp as a “modern interpretation of a flying flag” with six stripes and “handful” of stars. Each of the four stamp designs has a different number of complete stars. They were issued in coils of 10,000 for business use.
 
One April day in 1976, a man and his 11-year-old son ran onto the field of Los Angeles’ Dodger Stadium. The man spread out an American flag on the grass and doused it in gasoline. Lighter in hand, he was about to set our nation’s most cherished symbol on fire.
 
Suddenly, Chicago Cubs outfielder Rick Monday sprinted over, rescuing the flag just seconds before it would have met a fiery fate. Silent up until that point, the crowd then stood, began cheering, and singing “God Bless America.” 
 
Dodger manager and World War II veteran Tommy Lasorda witnessed the event. “It was the greatest heroic act that’s ever happened on a baseball field. He protected the symbol of everything that we live for. And the symbol that we live in the greatest country in the world.”
 
Monday, a Marine Corps Reserves veteran, recalled, “If you’re going to burn the flag, don’t do it around me. I’ve been to too many veterans’ hospitals and seen too many broken bodies of guys who tried to protect it.” Monday turned down a $1 million offer to buy the flag, stating, “That little piece of cloth represents a lot of rights and freedoms that people have given up their lives to protect... But the flag is not for sale. What this flag represents, you can’t buy.” 
 
The stamps were designed by Ethel Kessler. Her inspiration came from patriotic pins and flags of the 20th century. She has been an art director with the U.S. Postal Service since 1997 and has been involved in the creation of about 80 stamps.
 
49¢ Red, White & Blue, issued to satisfy the first-class mail rate
Issue Date: April 25, 2014
City: San Francisco, CA, at the WESTPEX Stamp Show
Category: Definitive
Quantity: 37,500,000
Printed By: CCL Labels Inc.
Printing Method: Photogravure
Perforations: Serpentine Die Cut 11 Vertical
Self-adhesive