#4801m – 2013 First-Class Forever Stamp - Imperforate Made in America: Building a Nation

U.S. # 4801m
2013 46¢ Made in America: Building a Nation Imperforate

 

At the beginning of the 20th century, some experts were predicting machines would take over many industrial jobs, forcing people out of work. Photographer Lewis Hine drew a different conclusion. He said, in fact, “The more machines we use the more do we need real men to make and direct them.”

 

Artists like Hine captured the dignity and pride of average workers on film. Rather than focusing on the buildings and machinery that marked the progress of the industrial age, he showcased the people who carried out their work diligently six days each week.

 

The building of America was dangerous during that time and accidents were commonplace. Employees accepted the risks as part of the position. In the midst of the Great Depression, people were grateful to have any job and worked long hours for low wages. Basic survival needs outweighed workplace perils.

 

Those who built the Empire State Building faced danger every day as they worked without hard hats or harnesses. They balanced on steel beams or wooden planks with the skill of tightrope walkers. Women found work in America’s mills, producing textiles for consumers across the country and around the world. Those who were fortunate enough to receive an education were sometimes employed in publishing houses as linotypers. Miners extracted the coal that powered the factories and towns. The risk of the tunnel’s collapse or the buildup of gases was ever-present dangers.

 

Lewis Hine documented Americans creating our nation’s railroads, airplanes, and buildings. Without his images, the faces of those who operated our presses, mined our coal, and built the foundations of our industries, would be lost forever.

 

Derry Noyes created the Made in America stamps using early 20th century photographs. Of the 12 stamps, 11 reproduce photographs taken by Lewis Hine, while the 12th came from the Kansas Historical Society.  Hines’ photographs had previously been used as models for U.S. stamps, including two in the Celebrate the Century series.  He was also honored in the 2002 Masters of American Photography stamp pane. 

 

Value: 46¢ 1-ounce first-class letter rate

Issued:  August 8, 2013

First Day City:  Washington, D.C. – at the Department of Labor Frances Perkins Building

Type of Stamp: Commemorative
Printed by:
Avery Dennison
Method: Photogravure printing in sheets of 60 in 5 panes of 12
Perforation: Imperforate  

Self-Adhesive

Five versions of the pane were issued, each with a different photo in the selvage.  Two of them picture Empire State Building ironworkers; one shows a General Electric employee measuring bearings, another shows a coal miner, while the last one pictures a female welder. 

 

Scarce Modern Imperforates

The modern imperforate stamps are one of the hottest stories around.  In 2012, the U.S. Postal Service released some issues as press sheets.  The sheets with die cut perforations were issued in limited quantities. 

To the surprise of many collectors, officials then issued a small number of press sheets without perforations.  The uncut sheets were only available in Kansas City, Missouri, yet most sold out immediately.  In an instant, the imperforate stamp sheets became modern rarities.  For example, only 75,000 Baseball All-Star se-tenant sheets were issued compared to 118,000 Bugs Bunny sheets with the 10th stamp imperforate.

 

In a controversial move, the editors of Scott Catalogue announced they would not list or give numbers to these stamps because they did not fit Scott guidelines.  This decision was strongly debated since the imperforate stamps are valid for postage.   They eventually decided to give the stamps minor numbers and have continued issuing imperforates in the years since.

 

Because they were issued in such limited quantities, these scarce modern imperforates can be difficult to find.  Luckily Mystic purchased a small number of each imperforate stamp issued so you can add these modern rarities to your collection.  Be one of the lucky few – order today. 

 

 

 

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U.S. # 4801m
2013 46¢ Made in America: Building a Nation Imperforate

 

At the beginning of the 20th century, some experts were predicting machines would take over many industrial jobs, forcing people out of work. Photographer Lewis Hine drew a different conclusion. He said, in fact, “The more machines we use the more do we need real men to make and direct them.”

 

Artists like Hine captured the dignity and pride of average workers on film. Rather than focusing on the buildings and machinery that marked the progress of the industrial age, he showcased the people who carried out their work diligently six days each week.

 

The building of America was dangerous during that time and accidents were commonplace. Employees accepted the risks as part of the position. In the midst of the Great Depression, people were grateful to have any job and worked long hours for low wages. Basic survival needs outweighed workplace perils.

 

Those who built the Empire State Building faced danger every day as they worked without hard hats or harnesses. They balanced on steel beams or wooden planks with the skill of tightrope walkers. Women found work in America’s mills, producing textiles for consumers across the country and around the world. Those who were fortunate enough to receive an education were sometimes employed in publishing houses as linotypers. Miners extracted the coal that powered the factories and towns. The risk of the tunnel’s collapse or the buildup of gases was ever-present dangers.

 

Lewis Hine documented Americans creating our nation’s railroads, airplanes, and buildings. Without his images, the faces of those who operated our presses, mined our coal, and built the foundations of our industries, would be lost forever.

 

Derry Noyes created the Made in America stamps using early 20th century photographs. Of the 12 stamps, 11 reproduce photographs taken by Lewis Hine, while the 12th came from the Kansas Historical Society.  Hines’ photographs had previously been used as models for U.S. stamps, including two in the Celebrate the Century series.  He was also honored in the 2002 Masters of American Photography stamp pane. 

 

Value: 46¢ 1-ounce first-class letter rate

Issued:  August 8, 2013

First Day City:  Washington, D.C. – at the Department of Labor Frances Perkins Building

Type of Stamp: Commemorative
Printed by:
Avery Dennison
Method: Photogravure printing in sheets of 60 in 5 panes of 12
Perforation: Imperforate  

Self-Adhesive

Five versions of the pane were issued, each with a different photo in the selvage.  Two of them picture Empire State Building ironworkers; one shows a General Electric employee measuring bearings, another shows a coal miner, while the last one pictures a female welder. 

 

Scarce Modern Imperforates

The modern imperforate stamps are one of the hottest stories around.  In 2012, the U.S. Postal Service released some issues as press sheets.  The sheets with die cut perforations were issued in limited quantities. 

To the surprise of many collectors, officials then issued a small number of press sheets without perforations.  The uncut sheets were only available in Kansas City, Missouri, yet most sold out immediately.  In an instant, the imperforate stamp sheets became modern rarities.  For example, only 75,000 Baseball All-Star se-tenant sheets were issued compared to 118,000 Bugs Bunny sheets with the 10th stamp imperforate.

 

In a controversial move, the editors of Scott Catalogue announced they would not list or give numbers to these stamps because they did not fit Scott guidelines.  This decision was strongly debated since the imperforate stamps are valid for postage.   They eventually decided to give the stamps minor numbers and have continued issuing imperforates in the years since.

 

Because they were issued in such limited quantities, these scarce modern imperforates can be difficult to find.  Luckily Mystic purchased a small number of each imperforate stamp issued so you can add these modern rarities to your collection.  Be one of the lucky few – order today.