#4259 – 2008 27c Tropical Fruit: Guava, coil

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Tropical Fruit
Guava
Die Cut 8.5

Issue Date:  April 25, 2008
City:  Burlingame, CA

The guava (Psidium guajava) has been grown, cultivated, and distributed for so many years, it has become difficult to pinpoint its origins.  It is believed to have originated from southern Mexico through Central America.  The guava is also common throughout tropical America, the West Indies, the Bahamas, Bermuda, and southern Florida. 

Guavas grow well in both humid and dry climates, requiring an annual rainfall of 40 to 80 inches.  They also produce more fruit when grown in areas with a more distinct winter season.  Mature trees can survive in areas below freezing for short periods of time, but younger plants will not. 

The small guava tree (reaching up to 33 feet) has smooth, thin, copper-colored bark.  The slightly scented white flowers bloom in small clusters.  The round, oval, or pear-shaped fruit has a distinctly sweet, musky scent when ripe.  The thin, light-yellow (with hint of pink) skin is filled with a grainy white, yellow, or pink flesh.  The sweet, dark pulp is very juicy and normally filled with 100 to 500 seeds (although some varieties may have no seeds).  Nearly all parts of the guava plant can be used for medicinal purposes, including the treatment of coughs and toothaches. 

In 2008, the guava was part of a set of Tropical Fruit stamps issued by the United States Postal Service.

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Tropical Fruit
Guava
Die Cut 8.5

Issue Date:  April 25, 2008
City:  Burlingame, CA

The guava (Psidium guajava) has been grown, cultivated, and distributed for so many years, it has become difficult to pinpoint its origins.  It is believed to have originated from southern Mexico through Central America.  The guava is also common throughout tropical America, the West Indies, the Bahamas, Bermuda, and southern Florida. 

Guavas grow well in both humid and dry climates, requiring an annual rainfall of 40 to 80 inches.  They also produce more fruit when grown in areas with a more distinct winter season.  Mature trees can survive in areas below freezing for short periods of time, but younger plants will not. 

The small guava tree (reaching up to 33 feet) has smooth, thin, copper-colored bark.  The slightly scented white flowers bloom in small clusters.  The round, oval, or pear-shaped fruit has a distinctly sweet, musky scent when ripe.  The thin, light-yellow (with hint of pink) skin is filled with a grainy white, yellow, or pink flesh.  The sweet, dark pulp is very juicy and normally filled with 100 to 500 seeds (although some varieties may have no seeds).  Nearly all parts of the guava plant can be used for medicinal purposes, including the treatment of coughs and toothaches. 

In 2008, the guava was part of a set of Tropical Fruit stamps issued by the United States Postal Service.