#4195 – 2007 41c The Art of Disney, Magic: Aladdin and Genie

Condition
Price
Qty
- Mint Stamp(s)
Ships in 1-2 business days.i$1.65FREE with 300 points!
$1.65
- Used Single Stamp(s)
Ships in 1-2 business days.i$0.40
$0.40
1 More - Click Here
Mounts - Click Here
Condition
Price
Qty
- MM644215x46mm 15 Horizontal Strip Black Split-Back Mounts
Ships in 1-2 business days.i
$7.95
$7.95
- MM214338x46mm 15 Vertical Black Split-Back Mounts
Ships in 1-2 business days.i
$3.25
$3.25
 
U.S. #4195
2007 41¢ Aladdin and Genie
Art of Disney– Magic
   
Issue Date: August 16, 2007
City: Orlando, FL
Quantity: 200,00,000
Printed By: Avery Dennison
Printing Method: Photogravure
Perforations: Serpentine die cut 10 ½ x 10 ¾
Color: Multicolored
 
Walt Disney (1901-66) was a man of vision who was interested in art from a young age. Many think Disney's most famous character, Mickey Mouse, was based on Disney himself. Mickey made his debut in the 1928 Disney cartoon Steamboat Willie, eventually starring in over 120 cartoons, movies, and the television show, Mickey Mouse Club. Disney credited his ability to realize his dream of "entertaining people... bringing pleasure, particularly laughter, to others..." to the fantastic financial success of Mickey Mouse.
 

Death of Maxfield Parrish

2001 Parrish stamp
US #3502b pictures Parrish’s Interlude (The Lute Players).

Painter and illustrator Maxfield Parrish died on March 30, 1966.  He made a name for himself illustrating children’s books, murals, and magazine covers.  His 1922 work Daybreak is considered the most popular art print of the 20th century.

The artist was born Frederick Parrish on July 25, 1870, in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.  He later took the name “Maxfield” from his grandmother’s maiden name.  The son of a Philadelphia artist, Parrish exhibited artistic talent as a child, which his parents encouraged.  In the 1880s, his family went to Europe and Parrish studied art and architecture.

Parrish Mystic First Day Cover
US #3502b – Mystic First Day Cover

After returning to the US, Parrish went the Haverford School and studied architecture at Haverford College.  Parrish spent three years at the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts, and then studied under Howard Pyle at Drexel Institute.  A critic wrote that even in his early work, Parrish “appears to have arrived full-fledged and finished in his art.”

1990 Life Magazine stamp
US #3185c – Parrish produced several covers for Life magazine.

Parrish went on to have an art career that lasted for more than 50 years and is considered to have helped shape the Golden Age of illustration.  He illustrated magazine covers for Harper’s Bazaar, Scribner’s, Life, Hearst’s and The Century Magazine.  Parrish also produced advertising materials for Wanamaker’s Edison-Mazda Lamps, Colgate, and Oneida Cutlery.

Parrish was perhaps best known for his numerous children’s book illustrations.  The fantasy life of childhood came alive with Parrish’s lush, colorful children’s book illustrations.  These included Frank L. Baum’s Mother Goose in Prose (1897), E. Field’s Poems of Childhood (1904), K.D. Wiggin’s The Arabian Nights (1909), H. Hawthorne’s Lure of the Garden (1911), and many others.

1979 International Year of the Child stamp
US #1772 – Parrish was most famous for his children’s book illustrations.

An innovative artist, Parrish perfected a technique involving numerous layers of thin, transparent oil and varnish which gave his paintings a distinctive luminosity.  A particular cobalt blue became eternally associated with him, as “Maxfield Parrish blue.”  He took art commissions until the 1920s.  Among these was an 18-panel mural for the Curtis Publishing Company.  He created a 15 by 49 foot mural of stained glass assembled by Tiffany studios that took him six years.  Today it’s in the collections of the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts.

US #4195 – Parrish illustrated Arabian Nights, which includes the tale of Aladdin.

In his later years, Parrish worked less on children’s books and more on murals, posters, and calendars.  His 1923 painting Daybreak is considered the most popular art print of the 20th century.  It outsold Andy Warhol’s Campbell’s Soup Cans and Da Vinci’s Last Supper, and is still in print today.

Beginning in the 1930s Parrish focused largely on landscapes.  He would build models of imagined landscapes, light and photograph them, and paint them from these photos.  He continued to paint until he was 91, before dying on March 30, 1966.  It’s been estimated he created nearly 900 works of art during his life.  Parrish’s art has appeared on album covers and provided the inspiration for movie posters, music videos, comic book covers, and more.

Parrish Classic First Day Cover.
US #3502b – Classic First Day Cover

View some of Parrish’s art.

 
 
Read More - Click Here


  • 2021 First-Class Forever Stamps - Garden Beauty 2021 First Class Forever Stamps - Garden Beauty

    In 2021, the United States Postal Service anticipated the arrival of spring with a new set of 10 Forever stamps honoring Garden Beauty.  Order yours today!

    $10.95- $64.95
    BUY NOW
  • Pre 1900 Fancy Cancels  May Include Targets, Stars, Numbers, or Grids. Set of 5 with small imperfections Pre 1900 Fancy Cancels
    Since they first appeared in the 19th century, fancy cancels have been extremely sought-after by collectors.  Act now to add five of these to your collection.  Stamps may vary, but that's half the fun!
    $12.95
    BUY NOW
  • 1950s First Day Covers, Collection of 100 1950s First Day Covers, Collection of 100
    Some of the stamps I saw in my set of 100 covers honored the American flag, Alexander Hamilton, Religious Freedom, Overland Mail, NATO, and more.  This money saving offer saves you over $90!  Order your set today.
    $89.95
    BUY NOW

 

U.S. #4195
2007 41¢ Aladdin and Genie
Art of Disney– Magic

 

 

Issue Date: August 16, 2007
City: Orlando, FL
Quantity: 200,00,000
Printed By: Avery Dennison
Printing Method: Photogravure
Perforations: Serpentine die cut 10 ½ x 10 ¾
Color: Multicolored
 
Walt Disney (1901-66) was a man of vision who was interested in art from a young age. Many think Disney's most famous character, Mickey Mouse, was based on Disney himself. Mickey made his debut in the 1928 Disney cartoon Steamboat Willie, eventually starring in over 120 cartoons, movies, and the television show, Mickey Mouse Club. Disney credited his ability to realize his dream of "entertaining people... bringing pleasure, particularly laughter, to others..." to the fantastic financial success of Mickey Mouse.
 

Death of Maxfield Parrish

2001 Parrish stamp
US #3502b pictures Parrish’s Interlude (The Lute Players).

Painter and illustrator Maxfield Parrish died on March 30, 1966.  He made a name for himself illustrating children’s books, murals, and magazine covers.  His 1922 work Daybreak is considered the most popular art print of the 20th century.

The artist was born Frederick Parrish on July 25, 1870, in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.  He later took the name “Maxfield” from his grandmother’s maiden name.  The son of a Philadelphia artist, Parrish exhibited artistic talent as a child, which his parents encouraged.  In the 1880s, his family went to Europe and Parrish studied art and architecture.

Parrish Mystic First Day Cover
US #3502b – Mystic First Day Cover

After returning to the US, Parrish went the Haverford School and studied architecture at Haverford College.  Parrish spent three years at the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts, and then studied under Howard Pyle at Drexel Institute.  A critic wrote that even in his early work, Parrish “appears to have arrived full-fledged and finished in his art.”

1990 Life Magazine stamp
US #3185c – Parrish produced several covers for Life magazine.

Parrish went on to have an art career that lasted for more than 50 years and is considered to have helped shape the Golden Age of illustration.  He illustrated magazine covers for Harper’s Bazaar, Scribner’s, Life, Hearst’s and The Century Magazine.  Parrish also produced advertising materials for Wanamaker’s Edison-Mazda Lamps, Colgate, and Oneida Cutlery.

Parrish was perhaps best known for his numerous children’s book illustrations.  The fantasy life of childhood came alive with Parrish’s lush, colorful children’s book illustrations.  These included Frank L. Baum’s Mother Goose in Prose (1897), E. Field’s Poems of Childhood (1904), K.D. Wiggin’s The Arabian Nights (1909), H. Hawthorne’s Lure of the Garden (1911), and many others.

1979 International Year of the Child stamp
US #1772 – Parrish was most famous for his children’s book illustrations.

An innovative artist, Parrish perfected a technique involving numerous layers of thin, transparent oil and varnish which gave his paintings a distinctive luminosity.  A particular cobalt blue became eternally associated with him, as “Maxfield Parrish blue.”  He took art commissions until the 1920s.  Among these was an 18-panel mural for the Curtis Publishing Company.  He created a 15 by 49 foot mural of stained glass assembled by Tiffany studios that took him six years.  Today it’s in the collections of the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts.

US #4195 – Parrish illustrated Arabian Nights, which includes the tale of Aladdin.

In his later years, Parrish worked less on children’s books and more on murals, posters, and calendars.  His 1923 painting Daybreak is considered the most popular art print of the 20th century.  It outsold Andy Warhol’s Campbell’s Soup Cans and Da Vinci’s Last Supper, and is still in print today.

Beginning in the 1930s Parrish focused largely on landscapes.  He would build models of imagined landscapes, light and photograph them, and paint them from these photos.  He continued to paint until he was 91, before dying on March 30, 1966.  It’s been estimated he created nearly 900 works of art during his life.  Parrish’s art has appeared on album covers and provided the inspiration for movie posters, music videos, comic book covers, and more.

Parrish Classic First Day Cover.
US #3502b – Classic First Day Cover

View some of Parrish’s art.