#3151n – 1997 32c Classic American Dolls: "Maggie Mix-up"

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- Mint Stamp(s)
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- MM644215x46mm 15 Horizontal Strip Black Split-Back Mounts
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U.S. #3151n
1997 32¢ Maggie Mix-up
Classic American Dolls

Issue Date: July 28, 1997
City: Anaheim, CA
Quantity: 7,000,000
Printed By: Sterling Sommer for Ashton-Potter (USA) Ltd
Printing Method:
Lithographed
Perforations:
10.9 x 11.1
Color: Multicolored
 
During the 1950s, children fell in love with the child fashion doll. Small – typically seven and a half inches tall, and made of a new material – plastic, the dolls were created by companies including Madame Alexander and Vogue.
 
The new dolls were virtually indestructible, portable, affordable, and fully accessorized. From ballgowns to school dresses with jewelry, shoes, hats, and purses to match – they had it all. Many examples survive decades later, due to the excellent craftsmanship of this golden age of American doll making. They evoke a multitude of fond childhood memories as dear and silent confidantes who never told a secret, got angry, or betrayed the friendship of their little owners.
 
Maggie Mix-up was one of the line of “Alexanderkins” made by Madame Alexander, a prominent American doll maker. Made only in 1960 and 1961, she is somewhat difficult for collectors to find. With sweet, freckled, little girl features, she was a classic American doll from the era.
 
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U.S. #3151n
1997 32¢ Maggie Mix-up
Classic American Dolls

Issue Date: July 28, 1997
City: Anaheim, CA
Quantity: 7,000,000
Printed By: Sterling Sommer for Ashton-Potter (USA) Ltd
Printing Method:
Lithographed
Perforations:
10.9 x 11.1
Color: Multicolored
 
During the 1950s, children fell in love with the child fashion doll. Small – typically seven and a half inches tall, and made of a new material – plastic, the dolls were created by companies including Madame Alexander and Vogue.
 
The new dolls were virtually indestructible, portable, affordable, and fully accessorized. From ballgowns to school dresses with jewelry, shoes, hats, and purses to match – they had it all. Many examples survive decades later, due to the excellent craftsmanship of this golden age of American doll making. They evoke a multitude of fond childhood memories as dear and silent confidantes who never told a secret, got angry, or betrayed the friendship of their little owners.
 
Maggie Mix-up was one of the line of “Alexanderkins” made by Madame Alexander, a prominent American doll maker. Made only in 1960 and 1961, she is somewhat difficult for collectors to find. With sweet, freckled, little girl features, she was a classic American doll from the era.