#1337a – 1967 5c Mississippi Statehood

U.S. #1337a Tagging Omitted
1967 5¢ Mississippi Statehood

Issue Date:  December 11, 1967
City:  Natchez, MS
Printed By:  Bureau of Engraving and Printing
Printing Method:  Giori Press
Perforations:  11 
Color:  Bright greenish blue, green and red brown

This stamp, which was issued to commemorate the state's centennial, pictures Mississippi's state flower, the magnolia.

Mississippi’s Road to Statehood

The Mississippi Territory was organized by Congress in 1798.  Development of the Territory began to flourish in 1804, when the United States gained control of the Mississippi River.  Economic development was also aided by Eli Whitney’s invention of the cotton gin in 1793 and the introduction of the improved Petit Gulf cottonseed in 1806.  These two advances made Mississippi one of the wealthiest territories of the period.  By 1812, the Mississippi Territory had been expanded to include all of present-day Alabama, Mississippi, and parts of Florida.

In early 1817, Mississippi was divided into the state of Mississippi and the Alabama Territory.  Mississippi was admitted as the 20th state of the Union later that same year, on December 10.  David Holmes was elected the first state governor.  Jackson, Mississippi, became the permanent capital city in 1822.

Now you can own this stamp with rare tagging omitted.  Did you know a stamp missing its phosphorescent tagging is considered by many to be similar to a missing color error? The good news is that unlike some error stamps, untagged error stamps are affordable.

What is Phosphorescent Tagging and Why is it Important?

Tagging of U.S. stamps was introduced in 1963 with airmail stamp #C64a. It helps the U.S. Post Office use automation to move the mail at a lower cost. A virtually invisible phosphorescent material is applied either to stamp ink or paper, or to stamps after printing. This “taggant” causes each one to glow in shades of green (red on older airmails) for a moment after exposure to short-wave ultraviolet (UV) light. The afterglow makes it possible for facing-canceling machines to locate the stamp on the mail piece, and properly position it for automated cancellation and sorting.

Some stamps have been printed with and without tagging intentionally, but when tagging is omitted by accident, we collectors are treated to a scarce modern color error. Our stamp experts examined thousands of stamps to find these just for you. Now you can easily give your error collection a boost or explore this fascinating new area of collecting. Quantities are limited, so order your untagged error stamp right away.

And find more tagging omitted stamps here.

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U.S. #1337a Tagging Omitted
1967 5¢ Mississippi Statehood

Issue Date:  December 11, 1967
City:  Natchez, MS
Printed By:  Bureau of Engraving and Printing
Printing Method:  Giori Press
Perforations:  11 
Color:  Bright greenish blue, green and red brown

This stamp, which was issued to commemorate the state's centennial, pictures Mississippi's state flower, the magnolia.

Mississippi’s Road to Statehood

The Mississippi Territory was organized by Congress in 1798.  Development of the Territory began to flourish in 1804, when the United States gained control of the Mississippi River.  Economic development was also aided by Eli Whitney’s invention of the cotton gin in 1793 and the introduction of the improved Petit Gulf cottonseed in 1806.  These two advances made Mississippi one of the wealthiest territories of the period.  By 1812, the Mississippi Territory had been expanded to include all of present-day Alabama, Mississippi, and parts of Florida.

In early 1817, Mississippi was divided into the state of Mississippi and the Alabama Territory.  Mississippi was admitted as the 20th state of the Union later that same year, on December 10.  David Holmes was elected the first state governor.  Jackson, Mississippi, became the permanent capital city in 1822.

Now you can own this stamp with rare tagging omitted.  Did you know a stamp missing its phosphorescent tagging is considered by many to be similar to a missing color error? The good news is that unlike some error stamps, untagged error stamps are affordable.

What is Phosphorescent Tagging and Why is it Important?

Tagging of U.S. stamps was introduced in 1963 with airmail stamp #C64a. It helps the U.S. Post Office use automation to move the mail at a lower cost. A virtually invisible phosphorescent material is applied either to stamp ink or paper, or to stamps after printing. This “taggant” causes each one to glow in shades of green (red on older airmails) for a moment after exposure to short-wave ultraviolet (UV) light. The afterglow makes it possible for facing-canceling machines to locate the stamp on the mail piece, and properly position it for automated cancellation and sorting.

Some stamps have been printed with and without tagging intentionally, but when tagging is omitted by accident, we collectors are treated to a scarce modern color error. Our stamp experts examined thousands of stamps to find these just for you. Now you can easily give your error collection a boost or explore this fascinating new area of collecting. Quantities are limited, so order your untagged error stamp right away.

And find more tagging omitted stamps here.